Tag Archives: Indonesia

Is Urban Farming Impossible?

By Achmad Solikhin

The adoption of the Urban New Agenda remains challenging for urban think tanks, most notably agriculturists who strive to resolve a dilemma between urban population expansion and agricultural land use. For instance, in Bandung, Indonesia, the increase in urban population growth needs two hundred hectares of agricultural lands to be converted into human settlements, industries, and other public properties. The increase also exacerbate the ecological burdens, such as pollution, water crisis, fossil fuel energy issues, and climate change.

Besides Bandung, the lack of agricultural landscape for farming that would feed the urban inhabitants has been an emerging issue throughout Indonesian cities. This is not in line with the Indonesia Government Regulation No. 19, 2016, which demands sustainable farming land for food. In addition, it is contradictory to paragraph 95 of the New Urban Agenda, that clearly supports urban agriculture and farming. Furthermore, if interlinked with nexus approach and Indonesian commitment for green house gas emission reduction and food security, 41% GHG reduction will be very tricky to be implemented in urban area over rural area.

With all these challenges, urban farming seems impossible on a scale. On the other hand, with new technologies and willingness to make a change, it can be done. As a possible solution, urban farming has been introduced to the urban sites, using various innovative techniques such as vertical gardens, aquaculture, small agriculture and rooftop agriculture,to name few. These techniques are demonstrated in the following projects, which are potent for tackling alarming urban farming burden, such as: Food Field, Farm, Sky Green, The Distributed Urban Farming Initiative, and Sharing Backyard. Inspired by these great initiatives as a potential urban landscape solution, a project called : “Carbon Farming Schools” initiated by the Indonesian Green Action Forum emerged.

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The Carbon Farming Schools are suported by UNEP Eco-Peace Leadership Center, Yuhan Kimberly, YUNGA UNFAO, UNESCO, and Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition. The project focuses on both food source and education. I tis run in Bogor, approximately 2 hour drive from Jakarta. Two elementary schools are engaged and supported young agriculturists of Bogor Agricultural University. Around 500 students have been actively involved.

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There is a wide participation also from other segments of society including other youth and local farmers. In the schools, the students are educated about climate change, urban farming, and ecological issues to find solutions and suggest innitiatives to tackle these issues. Subsequently the innitiatives are translated into real action plans. To test-run and implement them, they use a small agroforest in abandoned lands and limited spaces. And how does it look in practice? For example, a small number of fast growing and multipurpose tree species are coupled with vegetable plants. A vertical farming is also alternative technique suitable for limited spaces in front of a house or backyard. The great thing about the project is that it supports the implementation of the New Urban Agenda, making it more than just a collection of words on paper.

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#GSUYR 2015/16 Research Results Presented to Youth at PrepCom3

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

UN-Habitat Youth Unit team also launched the early results of its Global State of Urban Youth Report (GSUYR) 2015/16.  GSUYR 2015/16’s theme tackled the issue of rising urban inequalities. “Urban Equity and Youth Development” was the topic.

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With hashtag #GSUYR, WUYM’s youth participants in Surabaya and other cities joined in.  They conducted focus group discussions (FGD’s) to deepen the understanding of economic, political, social and cultural and environmental inequity issues in their own cities.  As a result, the research team received much-needed input from the youth.  The team is looking forward to launching the GSUYR 2015/16 report officially at Habitat III in Quito, Ecuador.

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Youth Said: We Can Be Partner in New Urban Agenda Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

Even before PrepCom3 proceedings got started, local Indonesia youth-led organizations IYMM and Kota Kita impressed everybody by organizing World Urban Youth Meeting.

This full-day parallel event brought together around 500 youth participants in a showcase of “Youth Perspectives and Actions Towards People-Centred City” on 24 July 2016 (Sunday), the day before PrepCom3.  UN-Habitat, together with UNTAG university and Surabaya city government, supported the joint effort.  With cooperation from Microsoft, Asian Development Bank (ADB) and UN country teams in Asia-Pacific, WUYM plenary sessions were livestreamed and linked with six cities beyond Surabaya, as well.

 

Firstly, UN-Habitat Deputy Executive Director Aisa Kirabo Kacyira captured the moment and said (at the opening ceremony), “the next generation [and women] must be treated as development partner if we were to succeed in New Urban Agenda.”  Her opinion received enthusiastic support from youth during the event, which ran non-stop all day, from 7am to 7pm.

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Perhaps more importantly, WUYM demonstrated that youth could be “doers” of inclusive urban development and policies that will be enshrined in the New Urban Agenda.  Youth-led and youth-inclusive initiatives presented  a range of variety expanding from the local to global: e.g. Urban Citizenship Academy, c2o in Surabaya, Safetipin for Manila, Youth 4 Global Goals, SDSN-Youth…just to name a few.

The Meeting was significantly diverse and highly participatory. The organizers directed the dialogue and focus group discussion (FGD) methodology; the youth volunteers facilitated the discussions, and the youth leaders shared best practices on urgent issues facing the urban youth such as “Good Government and Rights to the City”, “Urban Youth Against Extremism” and “Youth, Cities & Disaster Risk / Climate Change” (full schedule: here).  WUYM participants and speakers represented who’s who from PrepCom3.  Young people from 30 communities (kampungs) in Surabaya also joined forces.

To conclude a full day charged with youth energy, the APUFY 2015 delegate and urban planner, Emmy Yuniarti Rusadi declared at closing plenary, “We as youth have big responsibility in our own future.”  Having contributed to Indonesia’s national Habitat III consultations and also becoming one of the independent candidates for Mayoral elections in her city (after participating at APUFY in October 2015), Emmy sent powerful message to #H3youth, urging young people to see beyond “these big UN conferences,” and commit to act on the ground to improve communities and cities.  Joce Timoty Pardosi, Executive Director of IYMM, said their organization and actions in Indonesia, including contributions at PrepCom3, were the tangible legacy of APUFY.  Many youth speakers similarly expressed determination to stay engaged for the long haul, and to act as change agents both locally and globally.

#H3Youth Demonstrate their Collective Strength at PrepCom3 in Surabaya

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

Habitat III PrepCom3 in Surabaya Takes One Step Closer to Next 20 Years

Last week, in Surabaya, a city in the East Java province of Indonesia, which is famous for its green and inclusive urban planning, witnessed many activities as it hosted PrepCom3, the last Preparatory Committee before the Habitat III Conference to be held in Quito in October.  About 4,200 delegates from 142 countries participated in PrepCom 3.  As always, youth and children were active, both inside and outside of the United Nations conference process (we suggest you to check out twitter #H3Youth to get a sense of the experience).

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So what happened at PrepCom3 in Surabaya and what were the outcomes from the perspective of youth that emerged from the conference?

PrepCom3 was the last big major push towards the the road to Habitat III. Negotiations by national governments were in full swing to finalize the text of the New Urban Agenda.  At this 11th hour, diplomats, civil society members, local government advocates and major groups were all seen running in the conference room and hallways, voicing their critical input (as this blog is being written, however, we heard that delegates fell short of agreeing and they will push for it again in New York in late August/early September).

However, there was no hiding the fact that everyone’s focus was already shifting to beyond the New Urban Agenda, during PrepCom3.  Of course, what lies “beyond” Habitat III is 20 years of making sure that the Agenda becomes a reality in the cities all over the world.  In this context, one of the most exciting highlights from Surabaya was a vision of youth as an essential partner for the New Urban Agenda’s implementation, monitoring and its evaluation.  Youth actions and messages from Surabaya made this point impossible to miss.  In our view, we witnessed a positive and powerful turning point for #H3youth at PrepCom3.

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Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly 2015 – How it all began

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The first ever APUFY kicked off on Saturday October 17th in Jakarta, Indonesia with number of optional activities at the Ministry of Public Works and Housing. Although  optional, the 70% turn-out suggested the quality and energy of the historic event. Motivated and eager participants jumped into discussions without further encouragement and were later rewarded with a welcome reception hosted by the Minister Basuki Hadimuljono himself. To set the mood, the Minister proved he’s not only a man of big words and tough decisions, but also a melody when he sang and danced on the stage along other guests and APUFY participants.

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The main activities were set for Sunday October 18th. An impressive line-up of honorable speakers gave their opening remarks to the audience of 300 youth participants from all over the region, carefully selected out of almost 2000 applicants. Douglas Ragan, Chief of the Youth Unit, UN-HABITAT alongside Basuki Hadimuljono, the Minister of Public Works and Housing, Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, the Governor of DKI Jakarta and Gatot S. Dewa Broto, Deputy Minister of Youth and Sports of the Republic of Indonesia opened this remarkable event.

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The opening session set the scene and placed APUFY’s deliberations in the context of the recently agreed Sustainable Development Goals and the emerging New Urban Agenda to be adopted at the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development, aka. Habitat III. Remarks have been made in the global, regional as well as Indonesian context. Not surprisingly, youth came to be the key stakeholder in the equation of finding solutions to urban challenges.

Following the Opening, there was a very interesting and often amusing dialogue session between the Governor of DKI Jakarta, the Deputy Minister of Youth and Sport and the participants. The participants had a unique opportunity to ask any question and they used it without hesitation. Luckily, both of the honorable guests were eager to talk to the young people, and have answered even the most direct and sensitive questions. Here are some of the highlights of the Q&As:

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Q: I have heard Indonesia has a large number of young people. What is the most effective way to take advantage of such youthful population?

A: The most important thing is to educate them and prepare them for adult life. We need to fight high unemployment rates by facilitating their integration to public as well as private sectors. We need to create sufficient opportunities and activities for young people to grow and develop.

Q: What do you expect from youth in terms of building sustainable and resistant cities?

A: To contribute to building and fostering the unity and diversity, two very important things in Indonesia. I can’t even imagine how the Indonesian independency would look like without the young people. Given the huge number of youth, nothing can work properly without their involvement. Young people shall stop to be underestimated. Remember the Arab Spring. It would have never happened without the active participation of the Tunisian youth.

Q: How can youth be better involved in decision-making?

A: Internet represents a great platform as they can share their ideas, thoughts and opinion with their peers as well as us, the officials. Open data are public and cannot be modified before they reach us which helps to fight corruption as well. We can also make our budgeting and policy making more transparent and thus facilitate easier participation of young people. Lastly, we need to work on improving of our own image in public. Many young people believe that government officials are lazy and that they don’t care about them. We need to make ourselves more approachable to prove them wrong.

And what were the recommendations for the way forward?

o Having more public spaces for recreation and activities in social housing and public spaces generally which encourage multigenerational interaction.

o Electronic planning and budgeting that allows transparency because data is easily accessible.

o District level discussions that go to city and then province level.

o Making things transparent allows youth to get involved through these forums.

o Using social media and QLUE program.

o Create incentives for young people to innovate for cities and participate, not just about entertaining young people without results and not just about financial support. Harness creativity of young people.

o Governments should not only give voice to youth but also opportunities.

o Use ICT that is not just about entertainment but focuses on encouraging youth to innovate.

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Call for Applications! APUFY 2015

The first Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly at
APUF-6 in Jakarta, 17-18 October (APUFY) (Application deadline: 30
September 2015)

Are you a young person from Asia and the Pacific aged 18-32, and passionate
about urban issues? Read on!

BACKGROUND
As an official side event of the 6th Asia-Pacific Urban Forum (APUF-6) in
Jakarta, Indonesia, the Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly at APUF-6
(nickname “APUFY”) provides a regional platform for Asia-Pacific’s youth to
articulate urban issues and solutions impacting their lives and
communities. As the first gathering of diverse organizations and groups
representing youth in discussions of urban agenda at the regional level,
APUFY offers a step towards strengthening constructive partnership with
youth as key stakeholder in issues facing Asia-Pacific cities.

OBJECTIVES
APUFY seeks to achieve the following objectives:
To articulate priority issues and strategies for further strengthening
youth participation in governance in Asia-Pacific cities
To facilitate capacity building based on a variety of successful youth
leadership models and youth-led solutions for sustainable and inclusive
urban development
To demonstrate youth’s ability and knowledge by having a high degree of
volunteer-led design, management, and participation in a diverse and
innovative set of activities
To strengthen voices of Asia-Pacific youth in regional and global urban
policy dialogues by linkages with APUF-6 and the Habitat-III process,
including inputs to UN MGCY-Habitat III, and beyond

APUFY will offer a highly interactive and diverse programme, including two
plenary sessions, 12 thematic parallel sessions, skills workshops and
optional activities, cultural evenings, and dialogues on urban policies.

APPLY NOW
Please note, applications for APUFY international participants closes on
Wednesday, September 30 at 11:59pm UTC/GMT time.  Selection process for
Indonesia citizens may be subject to a different schedule.  300
participants will be selected in total.

To apply, please go to (international applicants):  https://goo.gl/N0VAje
For more information, visit the official website at www.apufy.org .

Save-the-Date: Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly

The time has come for the first ever Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly (APUFY) to take place this October in Jakarta, Indonesia. As an official side-event of the 6th Asia-Pacific Urban Forum (APUF-6), the forum provides a regional platform for Asia-Pacific’s youth to discuss issues and solutions impacting their lives and communities.

Save-the-Date (17-18th October) and watch out for the Open Call for Participants that will be announced in the coming days to fight for your chance to secure a spot at this special event. The selected participants will have incredible opportunities to meet and talk to fellow activists and entrepreneurs as well as high level politicians, global leaders and inspiring personas from all walks of life. The outcomes and recommendations are expected to be fed in and presented at the APUF-6 and the Asia-Pacific High Level Prep Meeting for HABITAT III.

The UN-HABITAT, ADB and the Indonesian Government are delighted to host this event and welcome hundreds of talented young people from the region to take part. Make sure to be one of them!