Tag Archives: Asia-Pacific

#GSUYR 2015/16 Research Results Presented to Youth at PrepCom3

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

UN-Habitat Youth Unit team also launched the early results of its Global State of Urban Youth Report (GSUYR) 2015/16.  GSUYR 2015/16’s theme tackled the issue of rising urban inequalities. “Urban Equity and Youth Development” was the topic.

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With hashtag #GSUYR, WUYM’s youth participants in Surabaya and other cities joined in.  They conducted focus group discussions (FGD’s) to deepen the understanding of economic, political, social and cultural and environmental inequity issues in their own cities.  As a result, the research team received much-needed input from the youth.  The team is looking forward to launching the GSUYR 2015/16 report officially at Habitat III in Quito, Ecuador.

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Youth Said: We Can Be Partner in New Urban Agenda Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

Even before PrepCom3 proceedings got started, local Indonesia youth-led organizations IYMM and Kota Kita impressed everybody by organizing World Urban Youth Meeting.

This full-day parallel event brought together around 500 youth participants in a showcase of “Youth Perspectives and Actions Towards People-Centred City” on 24 July 2016 (Sunday), the day before PrepCom3.  UN-Habitat, together with UNTAG university and Surabaya city government, supported the joint effort.  With cooperation from Microsoft, Asian Development Bank (ADB) and UN country teams in Asia-Pacific, WUYM plenary sessions were livestreamed and linked with six cities beyond Surabaya, as well.

 

Firstly, UN-Habitat Deputy Executive Director Aisa Kirabo Kacyira captured the moment and said (at the opening ceremony), “the next generation [and women] must be treated as development partner if we were to succeed in New Urban Agenda.”  Her opinion received enthusiastic support from youth during the event, which ran non-stop all day, from 7am to 7pm.

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Perhaps more importantly, WUYM demonstrated that youth could be “doers” of inclusive urban development and policies that will be enshrined in the New Urban Agenda.  Youth-led and youth-inclusive initiatives presented  a range of variety expanding from the local to global: e.g. Urban Citizenship Academy, c2o in Surabaya, Safetipin for Manila, Youth 4 Global Goals, SDSN-Youth…just to name a few.

The Meeting was significantly diverse and highly participatory. The organizers directed the dialogue and focus group discussion (FGD) methodology; the youth volunteers facilitated the discussions, and the youth leaders shared best practices on urgent issues facing the urban youth such as “Good Government and Rights to the City”, “Urban Youth Against Extremism” and “Youth, Cities & Disaster Risk / Climate Change” (full schedule: here).  WUYM participants and speakers represented who’s who from PrepCom3.  Young people from 30 communities (kampungs) in Surabaya also joined forces.

To conclude a full day charged with youth energy, the APUFY 2015 delegate and urban planner, Emmy Yuniarti Rusadi declared at closing plenary, “We as youth have big responsibility in our own future.”  Having contributed to Indonesia’s national Habitat III consultations and also becoming one of the independent candidates for Mayoral elections in her city (after participating at APUFY in October 2015), Emmy sent powerful message to #H3youth, urging young people to see beyond “these big UN conferences,” and commit to act on the ground to improve communities and cities.  Joce Timoty Pardosi, Executive Director of IYMM, said their organization and actions in Indonesia, including contributions at PrepCom3, were the tangible legacy of APUFY.  Many youth speakers similarly expressed determination to stay engaged for the long haul, and to act as change agents both locally and globally.

#H3Youth Demonstrate their Collective Strength at PrepCom3 in Surabaya

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

Habitat III PrepCom3 in Surabaya Takes One Step Closer to Next 20 Years

Last week, in Surabaya, a city in the East Java province of Indonesia, which is famous for its green and inclusive urban planning, witnessed many activities as it hosted PrepCom3, the last Preparatory Committee before the Habitat III Conference to be held in Quito in October.  About 4,200 delegates from 142 countries participated in PrepCom 3.  As always, youth and children were active, both inside and outside of the United Nations conference process (we suggest you to check out twitter #H3Youth to get a sense of the experience).

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So what happened at PrepCom3 in Surabaya and what were the outcomes from the perspective of youth that emerged from the conference?

PrepCom3 was the last big major push towards the the road to Habitat III. Negotiations by national governments were in full swing to finalize the text of the New Urban Agenda.  At this 11th hour, diplomats, civil society members, local government advocates and major groups were all seen running in the conference room and hallways, voicing their critical input (as this blog is being written, however, we heard that delegates fell short of agreeing and they will push for it again in New York in late August/early September).

However, there was no hiding the fact that everyone’s focus was already shifting to beyond the New Urban Agenda, during PrepCom3.  Of course, what lies “beyond” Habitat III is 20 years of making sure that the Agenda becomes a reality in the cities all over the world.  In this context, one of the most exciting highlights from Surabaya was a vision of youth as an essential partner for the New Urban Agenda’s implementation, monitoring and its evaluation.  Youth actions and messages from Surabaya made this point impossible to miss.  In our view, we witnessed a positive and powerful turning point for #H3youth at PrepCom3.

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Youth Participation in Habitat III High Level Regional Meeting

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The Habitat III High Level Regional Meeting for the Asia-Pacific Region occurred on 21-22 October 2015, hosted by the Government of Indonesia to identify key issues and regional perspectives for the New Urban Agenda. Young people were strongly represented as a constituent group throughout these proceedings, with their activities coordinated by the UN Major Group for Children and Youth (UN MGCY).

A total of 30 youth participated in the High Level Regional Meeting: 18 from Indonesia and 12 from other countries within the Asia-Pacific region. These youth came from a number of major youth-led organisations, like the International Movement of Catholic Students – Pax Romana (IMCS), the International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), Children and Youth International (CYI), the Japan Youth Platform for Post-2015, World Vision International (WVI), the Indonesian Green Action Forum (IGAF), and several others.

Throughout the forum, they worked hard to meet directly with Member States and stakeholders in order to advocate regional youth priorities and recommendations for the New Urban Agenda, in addition to maintaining two exhibition booths in the main foyer area to further highlight youth engagement. In addition, the UN Major Group for Children and Youth coordinated and hosted one side event about amplifying young Asian voices in the New Urban Agenda, whilst also having three representatives serving as panel speakers in two other side events.

On 22 October, young people’s voices were formally recognised in the meetings through the statement delivered on behalf of the Children and Youth Partner Constituent Group, a member of the General Assembly of Partners. UNMGCY, the chair of the Children and Youth Partner Constituent Group, delivered the statement which summarised the key priorities and recommendations of young people in the region on sustainable urban development, as outlined in the Asia-Pacific Children and Youth Position Towards the New Urban Agenda.

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These positions were put together through the culmination of months of online and offline consultations facilitated by youth, in addition to the key themes arising from the Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly (APUFY), which had gathered 300 young people together from the Asia-Pacific region earlier that week. In addition to making a strong call for children and youth to be seen as equal partners in the process, the statement also called for the right to safe and inclusive public spaces, a contextualised framework and new ways of financing sustainable urban urbanisation. It concluded by highlighting the critical importance of linking the New Urban Agenda with other intergovernmental processes to ensure coherency and build a more transformative, inclusive and sustainable future for all. You can see the full statement and the Asia-Pacific Children and Youth Position.

Overall, young people were highly engaged in this process, with many stakeholders voicing how impressed they were by the level and quality of youth engagement throughout the meetings. We were particularly pleased that most of the key points outlined in the Children and Youth Partner Constituent Group statement were incorporated into the outcome document of the meetings (the Jakarta Declaration), with stakeholder inclusion and participatory approaches strongly reflected in the language of the document.

Looking forward, the key regional youth priorities outlined in the Asia-Pacific Children and Youth Position Towards the New Urban Agenda will be used to continue to advocate the priorities of young people in the region with Member States and other stakeholders. In addition, the experience of meaningful youth engagement from this week will also be used to encourage stakeholders from other regions to prioritise youth participation and inclusion in all aspects of the Habitat III process leading up to Quito.

Data Innovation and Participatory Design: A Mash-up for Urban Development

APUFY has been a great success, to large extent thanks to our partners that put a lot of effort in organizing and running 12 parallel sessions throughout the day! While they were all amazing, have a look at the highlights of one of the sessions that focused on the importance of data innovation and participatory design in urban planning, through the lens of Lalitia Apsari and Kautsar Anggakara from Pulse Lab Jakarta:

Pimping Your City

The session highlighted the emergence of bottom-up data capture and participatory design processes that are empowering communities and better informing urban planning. But to attract the attention of the youthful forum participants we transformed Creating Cities for Everyone with Data Innovation and Participatory Design into #PimpMyCity.

The session was structured as discussion between the five diverse speakers with the audience raising questions through the hashtag on social media. We were graced by the company of:

Creating Cities with Everyone

When speaking of creating a city for everyone, there is a tendency for a ‘planning elite’ to take the lead. In a collaborative process, we shift from ‘designing a city for everyone’ to ‘creating a city with everyone’, combining both top-down and bottom-up approaches to understand the complex and evolving city system.

Mizah highlighted the complementarity of ethnography and data innovation, adding that stories offer meaning and context to the trends captured by the data. But, alas, it is not always easy to combine datasets, because, as Dr. Ying highlighted, big data is rarely open and open data is rarely big.

Gugun pointed out that open source and affordable technologies are empowering communities to develop highly relevant and granular data on their shared spaces and lived experiences. This is helping to address the data quality issues afflicting governments which was highlighted by Oshean.

Ahmad added that the validity of ‘bottom-up’ data collection processes is time and time again being demonstrated by urban communities, but that regulatory regimes make it difficult for governments to use the data. The audience agreed.

Empowerment is Key

Alas, it is hard to capture the depth of the discussion in a blog and we have certainly not done the speakers justice. But the questions and ideas flowing on Twitter was evidence that youth are more than ready to be engaged in collaborative processes of urban development.

The key point of the session was to highlight that while many different approaches to blending data innovation and participatory design exist within this space, the objective is the same: creating informed and empowered citizens and communities, both capable of better understanding themselves and of influencing decision-making processes.

Call for Applications! APUFY 2015

The first Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly at
APUF-6 in Jakarta, 17-18 October (APUFY) (Application deadline: 30
September 2015)

Are you a young person from Asia and the Pacific aged 18-32, and passionate
about urban issues? Read on!

BACKGROUND
As an official side event of the 6th Asia-Pacific Urban Forum (APUF-6) in
Jakarta, Indonesia, the Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly at APUF-6
(nickname “APUFY”) provides a regional platform for Asia-Pacific’s youth to
articulate urban issues and solutions impacting their lives and
communities. As the first gathering of diverse organizations and groups
representing youth in discussions of urban agenda at the regional level,
APUFY offers a step towards strengthening constructive partnership with
youth as key stakeholder in issues facing Asia-Pacific cities.

OBJECTIVES
APUFY seeks to achieve the following objectives:
To articulate priority issues and strategies for further strengthening
youth participation in governance in Asia-Pacific cities
To facilitate capacity building based on a variety of successful youth
leadership models and youth-led solutions for sustainable and inclusive
urban development
To demonstrate youth’s ability and knowledge by having a high degree of
volunteer-led design, management, and participation in a diverse and
innovative set of activities
To strengthen voices of Asia-Pacific youth in regional and global urban
policy dialogues by linkages with APUF-6 and the Habitat-III process,
including inputs to UN MGCY-Habitat III, and beyond

APUFY will offer a highly interactive and diverse programme, including two
plenary sessions, 12 thematic parallel sessions, skills workshops and
optional activities, cultural evenings, and dialogues on urban policies.

APPLY NOW
Please note, applications for APUFY international participants closes on
Wednesday, September 30 at 11:59pm UTC/GMT time.  Selection process for
Indonesia citizens may be subject to a different schedule.  300
participants will be selected in total.

To apply, please go to (international applicants):  https://goo.gl/N0VAje
For more information, visit the official website at www.apufy.org .

Vote Now for the next Youth Advisory Board 2015-2017!

The Youth Advisory Board is a youth consultative body that advises the UN-HABITAT on strategies to engage young people in sustainable urban development. Currently heading to its fourth term, the YAB has made tremendous progress in mainstreaming youth issues into UN-HABITAT’s work over the past 7 years.

On Friday 31st July, the voting for the next Youth Advisory Board (YAB) has opened its lines for exactly one month. If you are between 16-32 then use this opportunity to cast a vote for your future regional representative! 14 members with equal gender representation per region will work hard to put youth at the forefront of high-level discussions and decision-making processes.

Quick look at the candidates fighting for your support:

Africa

Mr. Abel Williams Cheayan, Youth and Environment Advocate, Liberia Mr. George Ndung’u, Country Coordinator for Organization for African Youth, Kenya Ms. Harimbolam Alala Rakoto Andrianjaf, Town Planner Technician, Madagascar Ms. Irene Ikomu, Youth Activist on Governance and Democracy, Uganda Mr. Josias Ambeu, Global Internship Program Director at AISEC, Côte d’Ivoire Ms. Margaret Koli, Social Entrepreneur, Kenya Mr. Mathews Mhuru, Program Lead for Youth Engagement at Marie Stopes International, Zambia Ms. Sarah Mwikali Musau, Project Officer at Action Network for the Disabled, Kenya Mr. Usman Muhammad, Coordinator for Africa at the UN University’s Regional Center of Expertise – Global RCE Network, Nigeria Ms. Vanessa Phekani, Social Entrepreneur, Malawi
Mr. Abel Williams Cheayan, Youth and Environment Advocate, Liberia
Mr. George Ndung’u, Country Coordinator for Organization for African Youth, Kenya
Ms. Harimbolam Alala Rakoto Andrianjaf, Town Planner Technician, Madagascar
Ms. Irene Ikomu, Youth Activist on Governance and Democracy, Uganda
Mr. Josias Ambeu, Global Internship Program Director at AISEC, Côte d’Ivoire
Ms. Margaret Koli, Social Entrepreneur, Kenya
Mr. Mathews Mhuru, Program Lead for Youth Engagement at Marie Stopes International, Zambia
Ms. Sarah Mwikali Musau, Project Officer at Action Network for the Disabled, Kenya
Mr. Usman Muhammad, Coordinator for Africa at the UN University’s Regional Center of Expertise – Global RCE Network, Nigeria
Ms. Vanessa Phekani, Social Entrepreneur, Malawi

Arab States

Ms. Aya Chebbi, Blogger, Activist and Founder of African Youth Movement and Voice of Women Initiative, Tunisia Mr. Fadi Abushammala, Youth Program Manager at General Union of Cultural Centers, Palestine/Gaza Mr. Hossam Hassan Ibrahim Ali, Social Activist and Co-founder of Open Space Egypt, Egypt Mr. Hussein Murtaja, Spokesman for Victims of Wars and Armed Conflict and Founder of Youth Letters Group, Palestine Mr. Karam Alhamad, Human Rights Activist and Freelance Photojournalist, Syria Ms. Lama Alghalib, Social Activist and Founder of Shababuna non-profit, Saudi Arabia Ms. Maria Difallah, Medical Doctor and Human Rights Educator, Algeria Ms. Olfa Lazreg, Social Activist, Tunisia Ms. Ru’a Al-Abweh, Architect and Urban Planner, Jordan Mr. Salah Algabli, Founder of One Hand NGO, Yemen
Ms. Aya Chebbi, Blogger, Activist and Founder of African Youth Movement and Voice of Women Initiative, Tunisia
Mr. Fadi Abushammala, Youth Program Manager at General Union of Cultural Centers, Palestine/Gaza
Mr. Hossam Hassan Ibrahim Ali, Social Activist and Co-founder of Open Space Egypt, Egypt
Mr. Hussein Murtaja, Spokesman for Victims of Wars and Armed Conflict and Founder of Youth Letters Group, Palestine
Mr. Karam Alhamad, Human Rights Activist and Freelance Photojournalist, Syria
Ms. Lama Alghalib, Social Activist and Founder of Shababuna non-profit, Saudi Arabia
Ms. Maria Difallah, Medical Doctor and Human Rights Educator, Algeria
Ms. Olfa Lazreg, Social Activist, Tunisia
Ms. Ru’a Al-Abweh, Architect and Urban Planner, Jordan
Mr. Salah Algabli, Founder of One Hand NGO, Yemen

Asia Pacific

Mr. Achmad Solikhin, Founder of Indonesian Green Action Forum, Indonesia Ms. Alexandra (Sacha) King, Social Worker, Australia Ms. Anoka Primrose, Environmental Conservationist, Eco-Social Entrepreneur and Youth Policy Advocate, Sri-Lanka Mr. Brabim Kumar K.C., Activist, Researcher, Writer and Youth Leader, Nepal Mr. Ho Yin William Chan, Urban Designer, Australia Mr. Kabir Arora, Coordinator of Alliance of Indian Wastepickers, India Ms. Koel Wrigley, Community Engagement Consultant, Australia Mr. Senel Wanniarachchi, UN Youth Delegate, Sri-Lanka Mr. SM Shaikat, Youth Leader and Manager of SERAC, Bangladesh Ms. Uditi Agarwal, Architect, Urban Planner and Culture Professional, India
Mr. Achmad Solikhin, Founder of Indonesian Green Action Forum, Indonesia
Ms. Alexandra (Sacha) King, Social Worker, Australia
Ms. Anoka Primrose, Environmental Conservationist, Eco-Social Entrepreneur and Youth Policy Advocate, Sri-Lanka
Mr. Brabim Kumar K.C., Activist, Researcher, Writer and Youth Leader, Nepal
Mr. Ho Yin William Chan, Urban Designer, Australia
Mr. Kabir Arora, Coordinator of Alliance of Indian Wastepickers, India
Ms. Koel Wrigley, Community Engagement Consultant, Australia
Mr. Senel Wanniarachchi, UN Youth Delegate, Sri-Lanka
Mr. SM Shaikat, Youth Leader and Manager of SERAC, Bangladesh
Ms. Uditi Agarwal, Architect, Urban Planner and Culture Professional, India

Europe

Mr. Abdelkarim Bellafkih, Engineer and Founder of Free Hands youth NGO, Belgium Ms. Caroline Romero Trueba, Teacher and UNICEF Volunteer, Spain Ms. Cecile Pilot, CliMates Youth Activist, France Mr. Christophoros Pavlakis, Un-HABITAT Youth Fund Mentor, Greece Mr. Jonas Freist-Held, Student Assistant at the Research Institute Fraunhofer FOKUS, Germany Ms. Katerina Gavrielidou, Young Leader and Global Shaper at the World Economic Forum, Cyprus Ms. Lise Weltzien, Social Activist and Researcher, Norway Ms. Meloe de Reuver, Student and Young Professional, UK Mr. Peter Mladenov, Human Rights Advocate, Bulgaria Ms. Wasima Khan, Social Entrepreneur and Blogger, the Netherlands
Mr. Abdelkarim Bellafkih, Engineer and Founder of Free Hands youth NGO, Belgium
Ms. Caroline Romero Trueba, Teacher and UNICEF Volunteer, Spain
Ms. Cecile Pilot, CliMates Youth Activist, France
Mr. Christophoros Pavlakis, Un-HABITAT Youth Fund Mentor, Greece
Mr. Jonas Freist-Held, Student Assistant at the Research Institute Fraunhofer FOKUS, Germany
Ms. Katerina Gavrielidou, Young Leader and Global Shaper at the World Economic Forum, Cyprus
Ms. Lise Weltzien, Social Activist and Researcher, Norway
Ms. Meloe de Reuver, Student and Young Professional, UK
Mr. Peter Mladenov, Human Rights Advocate, Bulgaria
Ms. Wasima Khan, Social Entrepreneur and Blogger, the Netherlands

Latin America & the Caribbean

Ms. Alexandra Pierre, National Coordinator of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network, Haiti Mr. Aldo Arce, Social Entrepreneur and Founder of Puerta Joven, Mexico Mr. Anis Badi Zarate Khalili, Youth Leader and Community Developer, Mexico Ms. Debora Gouveia, Social Entrepreneur, Youth Advocate and Founder of Engajamundo, Brazil Mr. Geraldo Porteny Backal, Philanthropist, Social Innovator and Human Rights Activist, Mexico  Ms. Jamilla Sealy, Regional Chairperson of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network, Barbados Ms. Jodykay Maxwell, Programme Manager at UNEP-Caribbean, Jamaica Mr. Julio Lima, National Social Director of TECHO, Brazil Mr. Leonardo Parraga, Founder of BogotArt, Colombia Mr. Luis Wilson Lechon Sanchez, Youth Activits, Ecuador
Ms. Alexandra Pierre, National Coordinator of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network, Haiti
Mr. Aldo Arce, Social Entrepreneur and Founder of Puerta Joven, Mexico
Mr. Anis Badi Zarate Khalili, Youth Leader and Community Developer, Mexico
Ms. Debora Gouveia, Social Entrepreneur, Youth Advocate and Founder of Engajamundo, Brazil
Mr. Geraldo Porteny Backal, Philanthropist, Social Innovator and Human Rights Activist, Mexico
Ms. Jamilla Sealy, Regional Chairperson of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network, Barbados
Ms. Jodykay Maxwell, Programme Manager at UNEP-Caribbean, Jamaica
Mr. Julio Lima, National Social Director of TECHO, Brazil
Mr. Leonardo Parraga, Founder of BogotArt, Colombia
Mr. Luis Wilson Lechon Sanchez, Youth Activits, Ecuador

North America

Mr. Aaron Joshua, Founder of the Canadian Youth Think Tank, Canada Ms. Chiara Camponeschi, Founder of Enabling City, Canada Mr. Hung Ho, Researcher, Blogger and Social Activist, USA Ms. Jordana Vasquez, Social Activist and Architect, USA Mr. Liam O’Doherty, Director of Digital Youth Engagement Programs at TakeITGlobal, Canada Mr. Marvin Mathew, Youth Activist Mr. Mohammad Asideh, Process Engineering Consultant, USA Ms. Olivia Labonte, Urban Economist and the Program Director of Young Diplomats of Canada, Canada
Mr. Aaron Joshua, Founder of the Canadian Youth Think Tank, Canada
Ms. Chiara Camponeschi, Founder of Enabling City, Canada
Mr. Hung Ho, Researcher, Blogger and Social Activist, USA
Ms. Jordana Vasquez, Social Activist and Architect, USA
Mr. Liam O’Doherty, Director of Digital Youth Engagement Programs at TakeITGlobal, Canada
Mr. Marvin Mathew, Youth Activist
Mr. Mohammad Asideh, Process Engineering Consultant, USA
Ms. Olivia Labonte, Urban Economist and the Program Director of Young Diplomats of Canada, Canada

 

Although the first impression matters, take couple of minutes to read the short bio of your regional candidates to make the right choice. Visit the UN-HABITAT Homepage and don’t forget to vote before 31st August!

Good luck to all candidates! We’re excited to work with the new Board soon!

 

 

 

 

Save-the-Date: Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly

The time has come for the first ever Asia-Pacific Urban Youth Assembly (APUFY) to take place this October in Jakarta, Indonesia. As an official side-event of the 6th Asia-Pacific Urban Forum (APUF-6), the forum provides a regional platform for Asia-Pacific’s youth to discuss issues and solutions impacting their lives and communities.

Save-the-Date (17-18th October) and watch out for the Open Call for Participants that will be announced in the coming days to fight for your chance to secure a spot at this special event. The selected participants will have incredible opportunities to meet and talk to fellow activists and entrepreneurs as well as high level politicians, global leaders and inspiring personas from all walks of life. The outcomes and recommendations are expected to be fed in and presented at the APUF-6 and the Asia-Pacific High Level Prep Meeting for HABITAT III.

The UN-HABITAT, ADB and the Indonesian Government are delighted to host this event and welcome hundreds of talented young people from the region to take part. Make sure to be one of them!