Category Archives: Governance

Global Survey of Youth-led Peacebuilding Organizations and Initiatives

UNOY Peacebuilders and Search for Common Ground have been working with the  Secretariat for the Progress Study on Youth, Peace and Security to develop a global survey of youth-led peacebuilding organizations and initiatives.

The purpose is to map youth organizations and initiatives building peace and preventing violence, to identify what they are doing, what impact they have made and their needs and goals for the future.

The survey will be one of the key ways of collecting data for the Progress Study on Youth, Peace and Security, forming a direct way for young people to have their work represented in the study. It will also be used to create a publicly available database of consenting youth peacebuilding organizations and initiatives.

Does your organization fit the following?

  • Youth-led: The organization or initiative is primarily made up of, and driven by (including leadership positions) young people. Resolution 2250 defines young people as falling within the age range of 18-29 years old, while taking into account the variations of defining the youth that may exist in different contexts.
  • Working on peace and security: Implementing actions that aim to build peace, prevent violence, transform conflict and actively contribute to establish sustainable peace in their community, nation or region.

If so, please take part in the survey! https://www.youth4peace.info/survey

The survey is composed of 5 sectons which include areas of work and methods, results and impact, challenges and issues, and recommendations. it will take around around 30 min to complete the survey.

If you have any questions about the survey, please write to survey@unoy.org

 

 

Urbanism in Mexico: Young Ideas for the Cities of Tomorrow

Since 2016 Badi Zárate Khalili has worked for the Metropolitan Institute of Planning in Guadalajara, the second biggest city of Mexico. With only 23 years old, he is the youngest city planner in his team and responsible for the coordination of public participation and communication. In addition, Badi has represented the Latin American youth in the Youth Advisory of Board of UN-Habitat since 2015.

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Badi Zarate Khalili; Latin America UN-Habitat Youth Advisory Board Representative at Habitat III, in Quito.

*Coordinating public participation and communication

*Urban Planning

It should not be a surprise that young people are getting a more active role in the design of public policies and decision making in the cities, it is just a natural step out of the enormous efforts made by previous generations. I had the pleasure of  volunteering in social action projects since I was 15 years old, which helped me understand the need of involvement of young people in making a difference and a love for service to the community started growing  in me since then and which is still my main motivation up to now. I began developing different projects as an activist for the right of the city and in 2015, I was invited to join the Metropolitan Planning team of Guadalajara.

Urban development in México has been a very firm and straight field dominated by a very exclusive group of people, mostly men. New generations have reached a new understanding of the importance of the cities and the critical time that we are facing. Yes, they have been pushing for a more inclusive agenda by promoting increased public participation in their communities. This has led to México having  innovative varieties of methodologies to bring the voice of the citizens to the urban development plans.

Although the course of youth has given enormous steps, there’s a lot left to do. The administrative system is still dominated by older men, and the inclusion that has currently been undertook, doesn’t reflect young voices and ideas in the final decision making. Young people’s ideas not only need to be listened to, but also taken and implemented with the same weight as other generation’s.

Programs that take into consideration the communities ideas and proposals have demonstrated their effectiveness on implementation. We have developed participatory planned Metropolitan development plans, major public consultations of the Planning policies, workshops on cities and growth for Children, workshops for young professionals about Metropolitan Planning and the building process of public policy, among others.

As mentioned, getting youth involved in city planning in México is an on going battle. But after proving their effectiveness and quality of work, this is slowly changing with young people being involved in the development and planning of cities.For example , majority of the people planning the future of Guadalajara, are under 30 years old.

Although the goals in the New Urban Agenda (NUA) have a long way to implementation, we are very content seeing that most of the work we do is based on the principles of the NUA; so we’ll keep on working in the same path, trying to be even more coherent by the objectives set by HABITAT III and to make our city a resilient, safe and inclusive place for all.

Key words: Inclusion, Governance, Local economy prosperity.

Courtesy of  Jonas-Freist Held.

Launching #UrbanAction in Quito

In October 2016, the world leaders and representatives of the member states will gather in Quito, Ecuador to adopt the New Urban Agenda, a brand new road map to deal with all urban issues and a guide to achieving SDGs particularly in the urban context. For the first time in history, young people were recognized as stakeholders in the drafting process and are frequently referred to throughout the document. That is why UN-HABITAT wants young people to be placed in the front line of the action that will follow. Acknowledging young people’s enormous potential and capacity, UN-HABITAT works with top global youth networks to ensure that Quito marks the beginning of the youth “#UrbanAction”.

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What is #Urban Action?

#UrbanAction is a global campaign calling on young people to actively engage in positive urban development. Youth groups, organizations and individuals alike will be encouraged to design and develop #UrbanAction projects in their city that build on the commitments outlined in the New Urban Agenda, and positively contribute to achieving one (or more) of the SDGs. We aim to implement over 150 youth projects related to New Urban Agenda and SDGs within the first year of NUA adoption.

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Why Youth?

Youth represent an essential and dynamic resource. Globally, 85% of the world’s young people live in developing countries and ever-increasing number of them is growing up in cities. We have the largest youth population ever – 1.8 billion young people are below 24 years of age. This is not a small number and as such, youth should be brought on-board as partners and assets.

Youth participation and engagement is the cornerstone of the #UrbanAction, empowering them to increase their level of engagement in local governance and activate their participation in sustainable urban development activities socially, politically and economically. Sustainable development cannot be achieved without significantly transforming the way we build and manage our urban spaces. The success lies in participatory and inclusive approaches that leave no-one behind.

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While Quito will mark the launch of the #Urban Action, with first few project ideas implemented, the real work comes after Habitat III is over. Coordinated through the AIESEC international network and other partners, youth all over the world will commit and implement their #UrbanAction projects in their cities, in line with the New Urban Agenda and one (or more) of the SDGs. Join #UrbanAction today!

UNAC, UN-Habitat and UN Women undertake 5 city consultation on Canada’s Role in International Development

During July 2016, the United Nations Association in Canada (UNA-Canada), the United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat), and UN Women conducted a nationwide series of youth consultations with the goal to elevate the youth voice on the International Assistance Review (IAR) undertaken

by Global Affairs Canada (GAC). The report can be downloaded at this link

ENGAGING YOUTH IN OUR GLOBAL FUTURE.

This report is a compilation of youth recommendations and views on international development according to GAC’s identified policy issues.

The consultations undertaken convened more than 100 diverse Canadian young leaders from Vancouver, Edmonton, Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa, aged 16-29.

The conversations were organized to address the policy issues identified by GAC for the IAR and the advancement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The importance of youth involvement in international development policy, and also in urban and national policy implementation, was echoed in importance throughout the country.

The following questions provided the framework of each consultation:

  • What is the role of youth in international development? Should youth in developing countries and youth-led organizations be supported by Canada to undertake development work?
  • What are the key areas that Canada should focus in empowering and improving the wellbeing of young people in areas such as education, skills training, governance engagement, and health?
  • How should Canada support girls and young women in areas like education, skills training, governance engagement, health, and safety?
  • Cities play a vital role in sustainability – What are the urban issues that are critical to youth globally? (Some urban issues: housing, transportation, jobs, crime and safety.)

The report is organized by thematic recommendations according to the policy issues of the IAR, identified by GAC. These include Health and Rights of Women and Children, Clean Economic Growth and Climate Change, Governance, Diversity and Human Rights, Peace and Security, Responding to Humanitarian Crises, and Delivering Results. However, as UNA-Canada, and its partners, embarked on its nationwide youth-led initiative, addressing youth policy issues was a recurring message across the country.

As a result of this call for youth engagement, a key recommendation to the Government of Canada is to add the theme of Youth-led Development within the IAR policy issues framework.

This submission has incorporated a Youth-led Development thematic component, in addition to

the pre-determined policy issues identified by GAC. UNA-Canada and our UN partners recommend, in concurrence with our Minister of Youth, that the intersectional youth voice be elevated not only in Canada but across the globe through representation in various levels of policy processes as well as through grass-root initiatives. Detailed recommendations from Canadian youth for youth in developed and developing countries can be found under Youth-led Development within the thematic recommendations below.

Engaging Youth in Our Global Future: UN Consultation on the International Assistance Review and Sustainable Development Goals

OTTAWA, July 14th, 2016 – The United Nations Association in Canada (UNA-Canada), in partnership with UN-Habitat and UN-Women, launched today a series of national youth consultations on the future of Canada’s international development assistance. The Canadian Government has called for these consultations to assure the voice of youth, Canadians at large and other international development partners in the development of Canada’s international development assistance programme. In addition to the consultations on the international development, youth will also be consulted on their opinion on sustainable urbanization, as part of a larger consultation on Habitat III and the New Urban Agenda.

The consultations, taking place in 5 cities across Canada, will convene young leaders from across the country to hear their ideas about the work of the United Nations (UN), Global Affairs Canada (GAC) and the role of youth in international development issues. Youth will be given the opportunity to shape future global development policy. Priority policy ideas emerging from discussions will be reported to Global Affairs Canada as part of their International Assistance Review Consultations.

The consultation just completed in Vancouver highlighted issues such as the engagement of international diaspora

“Young people’s ideas and participation are vital to the work of UNA-Canada, to the UN, the Government of Canada and our Youth Minister and to attaining the sustainable development goals – in Canada and the world.” States Kathryn White, President & CEO of UNA-Canada.

The United Nations Association in Canada (UNA-Canada) is a national charitable organization providing the leading policy voice on multilateralism in Canada, with 25 000 members from coast to coast to coast. Established in 1946, UNA-Canada was a founding member of the World Federation of United Nations Association and today holds the elected Vice-Chair, representing global civil society.

Doug Ragan, Chief, Youth and Livelihoods Unit, sees the critical role of Canada and Canadian youth in international assistance. “Canadian youth play a critical role in key global issues such as climate change, peacebuilding and the role of cities. We are excited to work with UNAC and UN-Women to assure their voice in developing Canada’s international assistance programmes.”

Locations and dates of Consultations are: July 12th: Vancouver, BC; July 15th: Edmonton, AB

July 22nd: Toronto, ON; July 26th: Montreal, QC July 29th: Ottawa, ON.

 

For more information please contact:

Elias León                                                          or                           Adlai Salcedo

Elias.leon@unac.org                                                                    adlai.salcedo@unac.org

(613) 983 5366                                                                                  (647) 983 9768

The United Nations Association in Canada

Our Work
UNA-Canada engages citizens and decision makers at every level of Canadians society. We invest across generations, bringing empathy-based educational resources on health, citizen education, diversity, peace and the environment to both the best and the brightest and to most marginalized youth within Canada and in the world’s poorest countries.

We meet our mandate with a national network of branches, volunteers and education programmes that are inspiring and mobilizing Canadians in support of the principles and critical work of the UN. By growing global citizens, we are building a stronger, more outward looking Canada ready to accept the greatest challenges of our time.

 

 

Youth Joining Voices with PrepCom3 Multi-Stakeholder Delegates

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

#H3Youth kept up the momentum built after the huge success of WUYM and other youth parallel event(s) at PrepCom3.  Their activities were in good cooperation with the broader multi-stakeholder groups who worked hard to bring about a more inclusive New Urban Agenda with an eye toward its implementation, monitoring and evaluation.  Youth groups voiced their staunch and great support for cities and local governments, as well as for the Right to the City initiative, together with the broader civil society and advocates for local governments.  Youth activists with disability linked up with stakeholder group(s) to lobby with great effectiveness to mainstream important considerations for people with disability and those living in extreme poverty in urban settings.

Two official side events at PrepCom3, both on 27 July 2016, gave centre stage to discuss youth empowerment and contribution in the sustainable and inclusive urban agenda.  The first was “Prioritizing Children & Youth Within the New Urban Agenda” that brought together youth representatives, development partners (including UN-Habitat), and child centred agencies such as World Vision International.  The session emphasized the critical need of the youth to unite and work together in partnership with local authorities and partners.

The second was “Civic and Youth Participation in the Wired Age” made up of city governments, network of cities (CityNet), private sector companies, youth inclusive initiative (Block by Block), data initiatives Pulse Lab Jakarta (part of UN’s big data labs), among others.  Here, Microsoft Indonesia’s Ruben Hattari cautioned PrepCom3 participants that all the new technology in cities could go to waste in the absence of a people-centered approach and engagement with citizens, especially the next generation.  Youth contributed with lively Q&A from the floor, saying that social inclusion should be ensured in technologies and city development.  It was another demonstration of just how youth engagement in urban policy issues should work.

 

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On the Road to Quito and Beyond

Going forward, UN-Habitat will support youth groups in their last one mile on the road towards Quito, and their journey beyond the New Urban Agenda.

We urge governments to accept youth as development partner – working together with cities and local governments, and ALL urban actors – in achieving the New Urban Agenda and meeting the SDG’s, especially SDG 11.

So, thank you so much Surabaya!  Congratulations to all youth leaders who contributed to PrepCom3 last week!  Don’t forget to get ready for Quito – and beyond!

Youth Said: We Can Be Partner in New Urban Agenda Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

Even before PrepCom3 proceedings got started, local Indonesia youth-led organizations IYMM and Kota Kita impressed everybody by organizing World Urban Youth Meeting.

This full-day parallel event brought together around 500 youth participants in a showcase of “Youth Perspectives and Actions Towards People-Centred City” on 24 July 2016 (Sunday), the day before PrepCom3.  UN-Habitat, together with UNTAG university and Surabaya city government, supported the joint effort.  With cooperation from Microsoft, Asian Development Bank (ADB) and UN country teams in Asia-Pacific, WUYM plenary sessions were livestreamed and linked with six cities beyond Surabaya, as well.

 

Firstly, UN-Habitat Deputy Executive Director Aisa Kirabo Kacyira captured the moment and said (at the opening ceremony), “the next generation [and women] must be treated as development partner if we were to succeed in New Urban Agenda.”  Her opinion received enthusiastic support from youth during the event, which ran non-stop all day, from 7am to 7pm.

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Perhaps more importantly, WUYM demonstrated that youth could be “doers” of inclusive urban development and policies that will be enshrined in the New Urban Agenda.  Youth-led and youth-inclusive initiatives presented  a range of variety expanding from the local to global: e.g. Urban Citizenship Academy, c2o in Surabaya, Safetipin for Manila, Youth 4 Global Goals, SDSN-Youth…just to name a few.

The Meeting was significantly diverse and highly participatory. The organizers directed the dialogue and focus group discussion (FGD) methodology; the youth volunteers facilitated the discussions, and the youth leaders shared best practices on urgent issues facing the urban youth such as “Good Government and Rights to the City”, “Urban Youth Against Extremism” and “Youth, Cities & Disaster Risk / Climate Change” (full schedule: here).  WUYM participants and speakers represented who’s who from PrepCom3.  Young people from 30 communities (kampungs) in Surabaya also joined forces.

To conclude a full day charged with youth energy, the APUFY 2015 delegate and urban planner, Emmy Yuniarti Rusadi declared at closing plenary, “We as youth have big responsibility in our own future.”  Having contributed to Indonesia’s national Habitat III consultations and also becoming one of the independent candidates for Mayoral elections in her city (after participating at APUFY in October 2015), Emmy sent powerful message to #H3youth, urging young people to see beyond “these big UN conferences,” and commit to act on the ground to improve communities and cities.  Joce Timoty Pardosi, Executive Director of IYMM, said their organization and actions in Indonesia, including contributions at PrepCom3, were the tangible legacy of APUFY.  Many youth speakers similarly expressed determination to stay engaged for the long haul, and to act as change agents both locally and globally.

#H3Youth Demonstrate their Collective Strength at PrepCom3 in Surabaya

Written by Ying Gao, edited by Jasdeep Randhawa

Habitat III PrepCom3 in Surabaya Takes One Step Closer to Next 20 Years

Last week, in Surabaya, a city in the East Java province of Indonesia, which is famous for its green and inclusive urban planning, witnessed many activities as it hosted PrepCom3, the last Preparatory Committee before the Habitat III Conference to be held in Quito in October.  About 4,200 delegates from 142 countries participated in PrepCom 3.  As always, youth and children were active, both inside and outside of the United Nations conference process (we suggest you to check out twitter #H3Youth to get a sense of the experience).

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So what happened at PrepCom3 in Surabaya and what were the outcomes from the perspective of youth that emerged from the conference?

PrepCom3 was the last big major push towards the the road to Habitat III. Negotiations by national governments were in full swing to finalize the text of the New Urban Agenda.  At this 11th hour, diplomats, civil society members, local government advocates and major groups were all seen running in the conference room and hallways, voicing their critical input (as this blog is being written, however, we heard that delegates fell short of agreeing and they will push for it again in New York in late August/early September).

However, there was no hiding the fact that everyone’s focus was already shifting to beyond the New Urban Agenda, during PrepCom3.  Of course, what lies “beyond” Habitat III is 20 years of making sure that the Agenda becomes a reality in the cities all over the world.  In this context, one of the most exciting highlights from Surabaya was a vision of youth as an essential partner for the New Urban Agenda’s implementation, monitoring and its evaluation.  Youth actions and messages from Surabaya made this point impossible to miss.  In our view, we witnessed a positive and powerful turning point for #H3youth at PrepCom3.

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Visit to Mathare by Youth Envoy

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Great to see  to the Secretary General, visiting once again the  Mathare Environmental Conservation Youth Group (M.E.C.Y.G). As he states, some huge leaps forward in services at the centre with the the development of the ‪‎Innovate‬ Kenya‬ ICT and Entrepenruship programs, the great work of the iHub – Nairobi’s Innovation Hub and their Kio Kits, the continued focus on public space and football, and of course the indomitable spirit of the Mathare community and its youth!!!

On Friday July 22nd, the United Nations Secretary General’s Envoy on Youth, Mr. Ahmad Alhendawi joined UN-Habitat and the Mathare Environmental Conservation Youth Group (M.E.C.Y.G) to check the youth-led projects in Mlango Kubwa community in Mathare. It was his second visit of this community and he was very impressed to see the progress the youth center made since 2014.

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Mlango Kubwa community lies at the periphery of one of Nairobi’s biggest slums. Like everywhere else, young people face many challenges there, from access to safe spaces to access to resources and opportunities. What distinguish them from others though is their drive, enthusiasm and willingness to strive for change. They take no chances and work together to make their community a better place for all, but especially for the children and young people.

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We were equally inspired and enchanted by the spirit of this youth. After we saw how they claimed burned-down space in the middle of their community, negotiated with authorities and built their first ever community football field with minimum resources and their hard work, we couldn’t not work with them. We wanted to support them so they can carry on their fantastic work and offer more opportunities for young people to grow in healthy environments.

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With the help of Samsung, we built a fully equipped ICT center that offers not only access to internet, but access to knowledge. As part of our Innovate Kenya project, UN-HABITAT and its academic partners developed a series of E-learning courses that come with the Samsung donated equipment. There are number of courses on offer, including project management, marketing or urban agriculture.

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Envoy’s visit to Mlango Kubwa meant a lot for the local youth, as well as for all of us who tagged along. It was great to watch how they presented their achievements with pride. It was even more touching to hear Envoy’s words of admiration and appreciation at the end.

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Keep it up guys!

 

 

 

 

East Africa Cup 2016 – One week in Moshi, the whole year in community

For the second time, UN-HABITAT joined the wider Sport for Development (SPD) community to lend a helping hand at East Africa Cup in Moshi, Tanzania. Despite the budget cuts, which allowed “only” about 1000 children and youth from the region to participate (as opposed to standard 2000+), the event was buzzing with laughter, joy and motivation to create new friendships and learn from each other. The inspiration and energy drawn from “One week in Moshi” often sparks the motivation and enthusiasm to carry the positive messages and action for “the whole year in the community”.

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UN-HABITAT jumps in to deliver one of the morning educational sessions, naturally on Youth & Urbanization. This year, the focus was mainly on Urban – Rural Linkages and Active Citizenship. 53 young men from various marginalized communities in Tanzania and Kenya participated in the three-day workshop, discussing the “push” and “pull” factors for human migration between villages and cities and the urban challenges in towns. Using play and cooperative games to spice up the knowledge-sharing, and the theme of football to keep it interesting, the boys came up with some very interesting findings.

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Somewhat surprising was the gender-element brought to surface. Hardly-ever do we hear from boys, especially as young as 12 year olds, to include “escape from early-marriage” as a reason for many girls to leave the villages. Furthermore, when outlining the contemporary urban challenges in their communities, they mentioned “girls being forced to prostitution” and “rape” among others. It is hard to say whether this gender-sensitivity comes from experience or education but in any way, it is important and really great that boys are starting to speak up for girls.

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Now when EAC 2016 is over, we can start building on the newly gained knowledge, draw lessons and develop further our current and new partnerships to make the next edition even more extraordinary!